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    The following are INFORMATION, ARTICLES and OTHER that I found interesting for the day, week , month. My PROFESSIONAL OPINIONS are added to the information based on my EXPERIENCES in the SECURITY and INTELLIGENCE professions. If YOU have ARTICLES or OTHER you would like placed on the site, please do not hesitate to send them to me with YOUR OPINIONS at efpipps@gmail.com. I look forward to ALL of your comments and information.

THIS DAY IN HISTORY 11/19

LINCOLN DELIVERS THE GETTYSBURG ADDRESS
On November 19, 1863, at the dedication of a military cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, during the American Civil War, PresidentAbraham Lincoln delivers one of the most memorable speeches in American history. In just 272 words, Lincoln brilliantly and movingly reminded a war-weary public why the Union had to fight, and win, the Civil War.

The Battle of Gettysburg, fought some four months earlier, was the single bloodiest battle of the Civil War. Over the course of three days, more than 45,000 men were killed, injured, captured or went missing.  The battle also proved to be the turning point of the war: General Robert E. Lee’s defeat and retreat from Gettysburg marked the last Confederate invasion of Northern territory and the beginning of the Southern army’s ultimate decline.

Charged by Pennsylvania’s governor, Andrew Curtin, to care for the Gettysburg dead, an attorney named David Wills bought 17 acres of pasture to turn into a cemetery for the more than 7,500 who fell in battle. Wills invited Edward Everett, one of the most famous orators of the day, to deliver a speech at the cemetery’s dedication. Almost as an afterthought, Wills also sent a letter to Lincoln—just two weeks before the ceremony—requesting “a few appropriate remarks” to consecrate the grounds.

At the dedication, the crowd listened for two hours to Everett before Lincoln spoke. Lincoln’s address lasted just two or three minutes. The speech reflected his redefined belief that the Civil War was not just a fight to save the Union, but a struggle for freedom and equality for all, an idea Lincoln had not championed in the years leading up to the war. This was his stirring conclusion: “The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

Reception of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address was initially mixed, divided strictly along partisan lines. Nevertheless, the “little speech,” as he later called it, is thought by many today to be the most eloquent articulation of the democratic vision ever written.

ARREST WARRANT ISSUED FOR MICHAEL JACKSON
 
Rumors had swirled around Michael Jackson since the first public allegations of sexual misconduct with a minor child were aired amidst a 1993 civil lawsuit that was eventually settled out of court. A decade later, on November 19, 2003, an embattled Jackson prepared to face criminal charges of a similar nature when a warrant was issued for his arrest on charges of child molestation. Though he would be acquitted two years later of each criminal count on which he was eventually tried, the erstwhile King of Pop suffered many blows to his already damaged reputation and finances while facing the charges filed on this day in 2003.

In fact, this day in 2003 was the second bad November 19th in a row for Michael Jackson, who had been caught on camera dangling his infant son from a hotel balcony in Berlin, Germany, exactly one year earlier. And that incident was only the most recent occurrence to have helped transform Jackson’s image from that of a beloved pop idol to that of a tabloid curiosity.

It was in this environment that a British television crew led by reporter Martin Bashir secured Jackson’s cooperation in the production of a documentary called Living With Michael Jackson, a film the ended up leaving Jackson feeling “devastated and utterly betrayed,” according to a statement he released after its initial airing. Living With Michael Jacksonincluded interview footage in which Jackson discussed having had children sleep in his bed with him during their visits to his now-infamous Neverland Ranch. It was this footage that led directly to Jackson’s arrest on this day in 2003 after the mother of one of his alleged victims—a 13-year-old cancer patient at the time of the alleged incidents—filed a criminal complaint in Santa Barbara County.

More than a year later, the case of The People of the State of California v. Michael Joseph Jackson went to trial, with Jackson facing four counts each of molesting a minor and intoxicating a minor, one count of abduction and one count of conspiracy to hold his alleged victim and the victim’s parent’s hostage at Neverland Ranch. On June 13, 2005, however, Jackson was acquitted on all 10 counts.

Shortly after his trial, Jackson announced his intention to leave the United States and settle permanently in the Persian Gulf nation of Bahrain. He would return to the U.S. in late 2006 however, though not to Neverland Ranch, which Jackson lost sole ownership of amid the financial struggles that dogged him up until his death in Los Angeles on June 25, 2009.

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